Double your donation: SUNY offers $50,000 match on emergency funds

The SUNY Impact Foundation recently announced it will match every donation the FLCC Foundation receives for student emergency funding by June 30 up to $50,000.

FLCC began its COVID-19 Emergency Response campaign in April to help students through the financial crises that came with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Logo for SUNY Impact FoundationTo date, the combined support of alumni, faculty, staff, and community members has raised over $25,000. If the campaign gets to $50,000, the FLCC Foundation will be able to max out this challenge grant to make a total of $100,000 available for student emergency needs.

FLCC’s student emergency funds include the food cupboard and emergency loans, as well as specially designated funding for students facing crises as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Throughout the last academic year, 54 students borrowed over $26,000 in FLCC Foundation emergency loans and 171 students used the Food Cupboard at least once. In addition, FLCC students have received a combined total of over $8,000 in emergency grants and COVID-19 response funds thus far.

The Foundation welcomes both new and repeat donors in the final days of this campaign.

Click here by June 30 and your gift will be doubled!

The intent of the SUNY Impact Fund’s emergency program is to help students experiencing temporary set‐backs such as: medical emergencies, job loss, housing changes or threats of eviction, backup transportation, backup child care and computer repair.

Messages in support of Black Lives Matter

The FLCC and SUNY community share the following messages in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

A Message from FLCC President Robert Nye

Dear FLCC Community,

Over the past several days our nation and our communities have experienced the anger, rage, sadness and grief as a result of the terrible loss of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The inhuman and callous treatment of George Floyd is not an isolated incident, but a long continuation of sad
and unnecessary loss of human life that lays bare the social inequities and social injustices that linger across America.

FLCC President Robert Nye in front of main campus
Robert K. Nye

We cannot ignore it, and we must address this issue. Since 2016, I have asked our College community to treat everyone we encounter with dignity
and respect. Dignity helps us to value individual identity and self-esteem. Respect helps us value others for who they are as individuals. We all deserve to be treated with dignity and respect. Unfortunately, in our world today, and even at times on our own campus, this does not always happen or hold true.

It is the reason that all across America and even in our own communities in the Finger Lakes, we are observing not just peaceful demonstrations, but also civil unrest as a result of years and years of both pernicious and outright visible social inequity and social injustice.

Our College serves as a dynamic learning resource, empowering all our students, and all of our faculty and staff to succeed as unique individuals who deserve to be treated with dignity and respect. When we do so, it is only then, that we may truly contribute to both the cultural vitality and economic vitality within our community. We educate students from all walks of life,
from all races, origins and gender.

By recognizing and appreciating diversity at FLCC, we can make ourselves stronger and provide an example for others throughout the Finger Lakes to
emulate and to counter social inequity and social injustice.

Diversity is strength – I believe this, and I ask that all of us at FLCC dedicate ourselves to embrace diversity, equity and inclusion in everything we do at the college, and to never look away when we see acts of social inequity and social injustice, because substantive change will not come until we stand together, support each other, account for each other, and learn from each other. Now more than ever, we must join together to make a difference, to engage our students, to engage each other, to help bring an end to the despair of social inequity and social injustice wherever it is present in order to make a difference for our College, our community, and our society.

Sincerely,Robert K. Nye signatureRobert K. Nye, Ph.D.

A Message from SUNY Chancellor Kristina Johnson

To the SUNY Community:

As so many of you have, I viewed the killing of George Floyd by the police—without reason, without due process, and without a shred of humanity—with a sense of both outrage and helplessness.

While we mourn this senseless cruelty to one man, protestors around the country are reminding us that what we just have witnessed is, in fact, an example of systemic racism in the United States.

Portrait photo of Kristina Johnson
Kristina Johnson

Despite the beauty of our Constitution and the Bill of Rights, the force of law is still regularly applied unequally and with malicious and disproportionate impact on people that are black, brown and LGBTQ. The injustice is intolerable, and it is compounding the anguish being caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and the economic crisis that has followed. It is easy to feel that our nation is experiencing an existential crisis.

What, can we, as an academic community, do in this moment of horror? Let me assure you that together and with a little focus on an unyielding moral compass, we are neither hopeless nor helpless.

We can’t instantly remake our divided society or divisive politics.
But we can demonstrate some of the same resolve and sheer focus on what’s right that this community has demonstrated in such abundance during the pandemic.

In fact, the compassion, bravery, and ingenuity SUNY people have recently shown in battling COVID-19 gives me hope that there might be answers to our societal miseries.

At SUNY, we were founded in 1948 in part to eliminate discrimination in higher ed, and our mission requires us to be “fully representative of all segments of the population.” When we see something that disadvantages students on the basis of race, ethnicity, economic hardship or gender, we
fix it—including a huge gap between the demographics of our students and the faculty who teach and mentor them. With PRODiG—Promoting Recruitment Opportunities for Diversity and Inclusive Growth—we set a goal last year of hiring 1000 underrepresented minority faculty and women in STEM by 2030, and we are off to a great start.

We are a community that does its best to welcome all, to offer opportunity to all, and to understand that there is power in embracing our differences and joining forces to do great things. At its best, the United States, too, stands for equality of opportunity. At its worst, it refuses to recognize and
repair the history of slavery and the mistreatment of minorities of all kinds.

As an academic community that educates hundreds of thousands of young people every year, we have an opportunity to explore and communicate both the worst and the best of history, and to shape new generations of citizens whose impulses to solve problems, to use their knowledge to help
others, and to serve the greater good no matter the personal costs, can help us to build a more just and caring world and ensure that George Floyd will not have died in vain.

Sincerely yours,
Kristina Johnson signatureKristina M. Johnson, Ph.D.

188 FLCC students named to Phi Theta Kappa honor society

The Finger Lakes Community College chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the honor society for two-year colleges, inducted 188 members this spring.

Phi Theta Kappa promotes scholarship, leadership, service and fellowship. FLCC’s chapter, Alpha Epsilon Chi, was chartered in 1981 and provides leadership, service and scholarship opportunities for members. Membership requires completion of 15 hours of associate degree coursework and a GPA of 3.0. Phi Theta Kappa members also serve as campus ambassadors.

New members are listed below by county and town:

ALLEGANY

Friendship: Calum Ruxton

Wellsville:  Samantha Bailey

BROOME

Johnson City: Rebecca Rayne

CHAUTAUQUA

Forestville: Brandy Schroeder

DUTCHESS

Hyde Park: Brie-Anne Sloniker

ERIE

Alden: Jessica Froebelv

GENESEE

Batavia: Aisha Thatcher

Byron: Daniel Jensen

Le Roy: Sarah Efing

LIVINGSTON

Caledonia: Deanna Krenzer

Dansville: Sierra Crawford, James Shepard

Hemlock: Brooke French

Lima: Paige Stein

Livonia: Kyler Cavalcante, Angelle Farabell, Ryan Mattice, Anne Watt

MONROE

Fairport: Phillip Emmans, Robert Gehring, Hanna Slaughter

Henrietta: Aaron Nestler

Honeoye Falls: Samuel Chunick, Lisa Lapresi, Allissa Merritt

Pittsford: Josiah Capozzi, Courtney Renner

Rochester: Laura Buckley, Laura Kieliszak, Stephanie Mahonsky, Elizabeth Middleton, Selin Ogultekin, Megan Rotunno

North Chili: Elizabeth McGarvey

Webster: Alessia Paratore, Courtney Teeter

ONTARIO

Bloomfield: Zachary Brautigam, Mackenzie Helling

Canandaigua: Charlotte Alvord, Andrew Asserson, Samuel Belanger, Raymir Briceno-Ortega, Samuel Brocklebank, Matthew Brumagin, Jamie Colf, Olivia Dipaolo, Chelsea Doell, Sarah Ducar, Ranita Gage, Olivia Garlock, Andrew Gregory, Terri Griffin, Elizabeth Haas, Rebecca Hazard, Dylan Hazlett, Jeffrey Howard, Aria McKee, Belle McKee, Cassidy Miles, Brendan O’Shaughnessy, Allison Pellett, Jaylea Ransom, Brena Rocca, Nathaniel Schue, Ashley Smith, John Squires, Anna Vitale, Emily Young

Clifton Springs: Anthony Dimariano III, Selina Finewood, Danielle Hildbrand, Coby Maslyn, Alison Romeiser, Sara Vanderhoof

Farmington: Christopher Ayers, Madison Cunningham, Jourdan Hurlbutt, Emmanuel King, Derwin Melendez-Diaz, Samantha Reese, Taylor Reese

Geneva: Emily Augustine, Jami Baran, Ty Bluto, Jonathan Ferrer, Dierra Godfrey, Joshua Hennessy, Briana Horton, Tatiana Klestinec, Electra Laird, Caleb Miller, Grace North, Bailey Wayne

Ionia: Nathan Bradley

Manchester: Travis Liberty, Benjamin Moran

Naples: Lauren Robison, Michaela Williams

Phelps: Jasmine Fiori, Jared Jensen

Shortsville: Florence Weed

Stanley: Dominique Robinson

Victor: Deyanira Ainsworth, Vanessa Conte, Kelly Duprey, Alexis Gossage, Naomi McMullen, Cole Moszak, Zane Palzer, Careena Raftery

ORLEANS

Medina: Kaylyn Holman

OSWEGO

Pulaski: Emily Klein

Oswego: Taylor Ladue

QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY

South Ozone Park: Munesh Roopnarine

SCHOHARIE

Sharon Springs: Owen Rohac

SENECA

Lodi: Sarah Farrow, Justin Smith

Ovid: Kodi Hopkins, Danielle Goerlich, Vincent Vangalio

Romulus: Sharon Goucher

Seneca Falls: Hunter Brignall, Mary Carter, Hunter Haust, Allison Hilkert, Georgedaliz Lopez, Madison McKoy, Brenden Sofo

Waterloo: Julia Corsner, Taylor Hurdle, Nicolas Lane, Derek Slywka

STEUBEN

Avoca: Nicholas Julien

Hammondsport: Megan Allen

Prattsburgh: Leif Jensen, Lydia Lenhard, Mackenzie Lynk

Wayland: Emily Bernal

WAYNE

Clyde: Nathaniel Brewer, Morgan Carr, Linda Gross, Alissa Hughes

Lyons: Shannon Sergent

Marion: Abigail Defisher, Christian Lopez-Dennis, Noah McKaig, Emily Passmore

Newark: Hollie Bassett, Aleah Buckalew, Ashley Cornett, Elizabeth Henninger, Marshall McFarland, Libby Smith, Haley Stivers

Palmyra: Lauren Crane, Cody Freeman, Casandra Hazlett, Jordan Huddleston, Harlan Miller, Earl Patton, Emma Perrone, Carissa Sabatasso, Ryan Saucier, Hannah Snelling, Lydia Wizeman

Sodus: Hugh Laird, Thomas Tangry

Walworth: Nicholas Block, Blake Britton, Alaska Dunstan, Abigail Giddings, Sarah Stripp

Williamson: Matthew Serody, Lindsay Sharp, Dara Storms

Wolcott: Sherri Lewis

YATES

Dundee: William Fryburger

Middlesex: Alexander Lyons

Penn Yan: Kari Ayers, Morgan Bayer, Deja Glover, Cameron Ledgerwood, Corey Ledgerwood, Chloe Madigan, Mildred Phillips-Espana

Rushville: McKenna Campbell-Fox, Misty Hill